New excerpt from TROPIC OF KANSAS at Tor.com (plus a review at Boing Boing)

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There’s a new excerpt from the opening of my forthcoming novel TROPIC OF KANSAS up at Tor.com, in which a young fugitive is deported back to a U.S.A. that has been walled off—from the other side. Over at Boing Boing, sharing the excerpt, Cory Doctorow provided a preview of his amazing and generous review, saying “Brown’s novel is just what you’d hope for from a long-awaited debut like this: a book that excites, provokes and terrifies.” 

Tor.com: Tropic of Kansas

Boing Boing: “An excerpt from Tropic of Kansas, a novel about a Trumpian, dystopian America”

Kelly Link on Tropic of Kansas

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“The great American novel about the end of America.” Pretty stoked by this wonderful quote from the amazing (and generous) Kelly Link—2016 Pulitzer Prize finalist and award-winning author of GET IN TROUBLE, PRETTY MONSTERS, and MAGIC FOR BEGINNERS—about TROPIC OF KANSAS, coming your way in just a few more weeks.

Preorder details here.

Tropic of Kansas Audiobook and other news

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The flat proofs of the full cover of Tropic of Kansas arrived here at the hobbit hole yesterday, and they look fantastic.

I’m pleased to share the news that the novel will also be available as an audiobook from Blackstone Audio, narrated by Josh Bloomberg and Bahni Turpin. I got to hear early samples, and they sound amazing, adding tremendous depth and feeling to what’s on the page.  You can preorder it for download or compact disk from Blackstone or Amazon. (Still working on the mixtape.)

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Bahni Turpin (L) and Josh Bloomberg (R)

And the first major trade review is in, a generous and mostly spoiler-free one from Publishers Weekly, with a great synopsis, and this:

Debut novelist Brown brings a mordant sensibility to his depiction of a ‘flyover country’ that is no longer willing to have its patriotism exploited and its land degraded for other people’s profits. His characters do not easily triumph, because he respects them too much to cheapen the costs that they must bear to succeed.”

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The Rule of Capture

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The Rule of Capture,” my contribution to the debut issue of RECKONING, the new journal of sf-inflected writing on environmental justice from the amazing Michael DeLuca, is now available online after originally appearing in print last winter solstice. The piece is about foxes, realtors, and the future—a somewhat experimental bit of narrative nonfiction that blurs into fiction.

The Rule of Capture” — Reckoning magazine.

 

Joe R. Landsale on TROPIC OF KANSAS

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I was stoked to read what my hero Joe R. Lansdale just had to say about Tropic of Kansas. Joe’s work was a big influence on the book, and Joe’s example as a writer (and as a person) sets a very high bar. Big smile. Sundance TV is working on the third season of its excellent adaptation of Joe’s Hap and Leonard books—check it out if you haven’t already, or better yet go directly to the source.

TROPIC OF KANSAS—the galley proofs

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Detail of the half title page from the galleys TROPIC OF KANSAS, in from the printer last week and about to be sent out to early readers. Design by Renata de Oliveira.

(Yes, I had to read a glossary of publishing terms to learn what a half title is.)

Forthcoming July 11, 2017. Preorder details here. Now available for preorder at HarperCollinsAmazon, and Barnes & Noble.

TROPIC OF KANSAS—the unboxing

Cross-posting this video of my editor David Pomerico unboxing the ARCs to TROPIC OF KANSAS. Just got my first copies and they look amazing. The design team did an incredible job of conveying the aesthetic of the text in the cover and interiors.

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Cover by Owen Corrigan. Analog broadcast flag, signal and noise.

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Interiors by Renata de Oliveira. I especially love this image of Old Glory as street art chipping away.

Forthcoming July 11, 2017. Preorder details here. Now available for preorder at HarperCollins, Amazon, and Barnes & Noble.

Democracy, dystopia, and the cult of the CEO

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“In the year 2018, nations have bankrupted and disappeared, replaced by corporations.”

Over at Medium, I just posted some thoughts on CEO presidents and the idea of “running government like a business.”  And the more important question of what Rollerball has to do with it all:

You’re Fired—Democracy, Dystopia and the Cult of the CEO

Live streaming

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In the morning I took my visiting parents just past the limits of the northwest suburbs for a nature walk. The place we went is a wildlife refuge carved from old ranches to protect two endangered species of songbirds who rely on this very specific habitat threatened by encroaching subdivisions.  The drive took about forty-five minutes as we passed through a series of landscapes—urban freeway, frontage road, suburban chain sprawl, county road, and finally an old ranch road that followed the course of a gorgeous creek flowing clear and full over denuded limestone. A sanctuary of ecological recovery, where even the invasive ash juniper trees whose noxious spores fill the winter skies were finally being cleared out.

We walked a trail that followed a beautiful stream lined with cottonwoods and live oaks and dotted with the long-haired muelys we have growing on our roof but which I had never seen in their native riparian habitat. My mother, who lives in the woods up north, is more interested in mushrooms than people, and does not own a mobile phone, found a spot that I would have walked right past where there was a small redbud tree with the first fresh fuchsia blooms of spring. She sat down on a rock and watched the different butterflies come and visit the tree, slowing the walk into a long stillness that required no spoken language to communally summon.

I looked at my phone as I was taking pictures and noticed I had no signal, after hours of nonstop breaking news bulletins while the regime drama of the day unfolded. And I realized the butterflies had momentarily replaced the phone alerts, and the only thing streaming was the burbling creek. Some kind of pointer in how to secure liberated territory in the age of atemporality.

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