RULE OF CAPTURE cover reveal

RuleOfCapture PB hi-res final

I am delighted to share this cover reveal for my new novel Rule of Capture, forthcoming from Harper this summer. Please click through to the Harper Voyager blog for a guest post in which I get to share my more detailed thoughts about the cover, explain why it suits the story so well, and tell a bit more about the story and what we mean when we call it a “dystopian legal thriller.” And if it sounds interesting to you, please consider pre-ordering the book, which will be available in print, e-book and audio formats.

Cover Reveal: RULE OF CAPTURE by Christopher Brown

 

Тропик Канзаса

ToK Russian back cover  ToK Russian cover higher res

Loving this cover (and back cover) for the Russian translation of Tropic of Kansas, forthcoming in April from Fanzon / Eksmo. It really nails the atmosphere of the book. Details (and excerpt) at the link (quality translations welcome—though I love the way the bot translates one passage in the creative copy as “fake smiles are broken in teeth,” and translates the character name Sig to “Whitefish”—then makes an allusive play on catching fish).

Тропик Канзаса

 

2018 Reading

wiener martial law

I’ve been keeping a low profile online lately as I finish revisions on my forthcoming novel RULE OF CAPTURE, but I was able to share some of my 2018 reading over at the Aqueduct Press blog, including some of the weird research I have been doing for the new book—like the curious little handbook pictured above. Thanks to Timmi Duchamp and the folks at Aqueduct for having me back again.

TROPIC OF KANSAS e-book a Kindle monthly deal

This week brought the news that Tropic of Kansas is a Kindle Monthly Deal from now through November 5—$2.99 for the e-book. Thanks to all of the folks who have already checked it out.

This week’s memory feed also served a reminder of one of my favorite squibs on the book, from one year ago in Booklist:

Booklist on ToK 9-27-17

A nice boost as I crank on what’s next.

Recent and upcoming appearances

The fine folks at Malvern Books have posted this video of my recent reading at the store of a very short excerpt from my forthcoming novel RULE OF CAPTURE, currently slated for publication by Harper Voyager in 2019. Thanks to Malvern for hosting the group event of which this was a part. Also up at the Malvern YouTube page are the readings from my fellow Austin writers Patrice Sarath, who put the event together, Jessica Reisman, Stina Leicht, Marshall Ryan Maresca, Amanda Downum, and Robert Ashcroft.

This weekend I will be at Worldcon in San Jose, with a couple of panels and an autographing. Hope to see some of you there.

CB Worldcon 2018 programming

 

Book birthday

Preorder Tropic of Kansas from Amazon

Today is the one-year anniversary of my novel Tropic of Kansas. I have been very fortunate in the reception the book has had, and am deeply appreciative of the support of readers, reviewers, colleagues, and the team at Harper who made it possible. The book’s recognition last month as a finalist for the 2018 John W. Campbell Memorial Award for best science fiction novel was the culmination of an amazing year.

If you read the sampling of what folks have said about the book, you’ll find many crediting the author’s prescience, or remarking on the way the book seems ripped from the headlines. The truth is that I worked hard to set the book in a very different version of reality from the one we live in. It was essential to do that, I thought, to take the book where I wanted it to go. I wanted to imagine an America facing the kind of revolutionary unrest I saw people enduring in other parts of the world when I began writing the book in 2012, often as the consequence of our own actions. At the same time, I tried to ground it in realism—a speculative realism that puts a fun house mirror up to the world. So I focused on the parts of America I see out there that we have allowed to degenerate into what we used to call third world, threw in ideas like CEO presidents, corporate mercenaries, flying killer robots, ecological exhaustion, direct democracy, network politics, insurrection, and the possibility of Anthropocene renewal, and played with the mixing board. That my dystopian experiment resulted in a book whose scenes echo in the daily train wreck that is our newsfeed just proves the well-established truism of the Gomi-no-Sensei.

 

 

Screen Shot 2018-07-11 at 9.01.36 AM Screen Shot 2018-07-11 at 9.01.05 AMScreen Shot 2018-07-11 at 9.02.43 AMScreen Shot 2018-07-11 at 9.01.49 AM

 

Tropic of Kansas is a dark book, as many remarked. It went to dark places in an effort to find its way to a more hopeful future. It didn’t get all the way to utopia, but you could see it from there, out there on the horizon. Tropic of Kansas did well enough that I get to write two more novels that explore similar territory, through the point of view of a lawyer in an America that is experiencing the end of the rule of law— “Better Call Saul meets Nineteen Eighty-Four.” I’m about to turn the first of those books in, which has been a lot of fun to work on. Part of the aspiration, in addition to telling an entertaining story, is to frame a window onto the possibility of American renewal, grounded in green thinking and emancipatory politics. I like to think that science fiction has a role to play in imagining better real tomorrows, especially if it works hard to tell the truth, and that if we do our jobs well we might even fashion a means to actually open a crack in that window.

I appreciate the opportunity, and the support of all of those who have given my work a shot.

TROPIC OF KANSAS a Campbell Award finalist

Campbell finalists 2018

I was honored to see Tropic of Kansas among the finalists for the 2018 John W. Campbell Memorial Award for best science fiction novel of the year, especially among such remarkable company. Congratulations to all the nominees, who include many friends and colleagues, and particular congratulations to the winner announced at last Friday’s ceremony, David Walton.

KGB Fantastic Fiction—photos and audio

KGB by Kressel 12-20-17

Matt Kressel shared this great photo he took of me reading at KGB Fantastic Fiction in New York last month, together with the amazing N. K. Jemisin. We had an awesome turnout of folks on a cold night, and both ended up reading stories of revolution and resistance in a bar full of relics of the Russian revolution. Thanks to Matt and co-host Ellen Datlow and Matthew Kressel, to Nora for sharing the podium, and to everyone who joined us in the audience (including some of my New York friends and family).

25446482_10155161970196439_7490070857857693745_n

Here’s a photo I took of Matt and Ellen, with Henry Wessells just behind Matthew to the left.

Ellen’s photos from the night are now up at her Flickr, including this nice shot of me with my cousin the dancer and choreographer Katiti King.

katiti and chris kgb 12-20-17

And Matt just posted audio of my reading, from the opening of Tropic of Kansas. Thanks to Gordon Linzner for the great recording. It is also available through the KGB podcast at your preferred provider.

Lastly, a very nice photo Ellen took of me and my newly NYC-based son, Hugo Nakashima-Brown.

hugo and chris kgb 12-20-17

 

Talking heads

In the year 2017, science fiction writers will be invited to appear as commentators on Sunday morning public affairs shows.

I was deleted to have the opportunity to appear as a guest on “Story in the Public Square,” a great new program hosted by Jim Ludes of the Pell Center at Salve Regina University in Newport and G. Wayne Miller of the Providence Journal-Bulletin, broadcast on Rhode Island Public Television and the SiriusXM P.O.T.U.S. channel. We discussed Tropic of Kansas, dystopian realism, and the nexus of speculative fiction & American political life, in what I thought it was an engaging conversation. I very much appreciated the opportunity, and expect we will see more public dialogues like this as our daily reality becomes increasingly science fictional.

Story in the Public Square: Christopher Brown